Tip of the Day

Really getting the latest changes with TFS

TFS Source Control doesn’t always get the latest changes. It gets what it thinks are the latest changes (and for the most part it gets it right if you work exclusively in Visual Studio). However, there are times when it gets it wrong and you have to force its hand a little.

So, if you have issues getting latest code then what you need to do is:

  • Right click the branch or folder that is problematic
  • Go to the “advanced” sub-menu and click “Get Specific Version…”
  • Then in the dialog check the two “overwrite…” boxes
  • Finally, press “Get”

At this point VS/TFS will retrieve all the files in the branch/folder selected and overwrite existing files. It will also retrieve files it didn’t already have, even although it thought it had them.

Tip of the Day

How to recover deleted files, folders and branches in TFS

In Visual Studio go to the menu item Tools–>Options…

Then navigate to the Source Control –> Visual Studio Team Foundation Server section.

In that section is a check box that says “Show deleted items in the Source Control Explorer”

Once you’ve ensured that the checkbox is checked, press “OK”

Then navigate to the Source Control Explorer and you’ll see that deleted files, folders and branches are now displayed with a large red cross next to them.

Right click the item you want to recover and select “Undelete” from the menu.

At this point Visual Studio stops responding to input. It displays a wait spinner briefly, but mostly it just looks like it has hung.

When Visual Studio does come back to life you can go to the Pending Changes to see the newly recovered files, folders, or branches.

If you are happy with this change, you can check it in to TFS as normal.

Software Development

Linking Perforce Merge to Git

Git’s built in Merge conflict resolution is awful. Although all the information is there it is difficult to use for all but the simplest of conflicts. Luckily, it is relatively easy to wire up a third party diff and merge tools to help.

Setting up as a diff tool.

You can download the Perforce Visual Merge Tool here. The only part of the installer that is needed is the “Visual Merge Tool (P4Merge)”

Perforce Installation Wizard - Feature Selection
Perforce Installation Wizard – Feature Selection

To configure Git to use the p4merge as the diff tool, the global config needs to be edited. The global config, on Windows 7 and 8 is found in c:\users\<username>\.gitconfig

The following needs to be added:

[diff]
    tool = P4Merge
[difftool "P4Merge"]
    cmd = p4merge "$LOCAL" "$REMOTE"

The [diff] section sets up the default tool to use, you can configure as many as you like. The [difftool "toolname"] section sets up the options for a specific tool.

Now, in Git Bash, you can type git difftool and it will show the diffs in the perforce merge tool between the current file and the previous commit.

If you have multiple files that have changes it will prompt one-by-one to view them in the diff tool.

If you’ve already staged the files (prior to a commit) then you’ll need to type git difftool --cached in order for them to show up.

If you wish to see just a specific file you can use git difftool name-of-file

Again, add the --cached option (just before the filename) if you’ve already staged the file prior to a commit.

Setting up as a Merge Tool

Open up the .gitconfig file, as above, and make some changes to it. Add the following sections to it which are similar to the diff tool.

[merge]
    tool = P4Merge
[mergetool "P4Merge"]
    cmd = p4merge "$BASE" "$LOCAL" "$REMOTE" "$MERGED"
    keepTemporaries = false
    trustExitCode = false
    keepBackup = false

If you get a merge conflict when merging branches or pulling down from the remote repository you can now use git mergetool to merge the changes.

Software Development

Getting Tortoise Git to work with GitHub repositories

In this post I’ll walk you through installing Tortoise Git in a way that allows it to interact easily with GitHub repositories.

Download msysgit

First off download msysgit, a prerequisite for running Tortoise Git. (A the time of writing this was v1.8.3).

For the installation, I mostly accepted all the default options. The only change I made was to allow the system’s PATH environment variable to be updated. This will be required for a latter step.

I also left the default “Checkout windows-style, commit unix-style endings”, which is equivalent to the git option core.autocrlf being set to true. You probably also want to set this on if you don’t have it set already. GitHub also has an article on their site about file specific options that you might want to include in a .gitattributes file in your repository.

If you have any existing repositories on your system you can now use GitBash to work with them. At the moment each command, however, will require you to type your user name and password.

Download Tortoise Git

Then download Tortoise Git (v1.8.4 at the time of writing). If you have Windows 8 you should go for the 64-bit edition. Again, I just accepted all the default installation options.

As with GitBash in the msysgit installation, once this is set up you’ll be able to work with any existing repositories, and again each operation will require a user name and password to be allowed.

Download the git-credential-winstore

GitHub has an article on how to set up password caching (skip to “password caching” for download link) if you are using tools other than GitHub for Windows. The file requires that the path variable has the git bin folder in it. This will be the case if the option above was made when installing msysgit. I also found that a machine reboot was required before installing this as it didn’t immediately find git in the path after installing msysgit.

The git-credential-winstore install very quickly. It asks one slightly confusingly worded question, “Do you want to install git-credential-winstore to prompt for passwords?”. The correct answer is “yes”. It doesn’t mean that it will always prompt you instead of at the command line or the GUI tool, it will only prompt for a password if it does not know the credentials to use, after that it uses what’s in its credential store so you don’t get asked all the time.

When git-credentials-winstore is installed it will create a [credentials] section in your .gitconfig file which should be at C:\Users\<username>\.gitconfig

Be aware, however, that GitHub does have a nasty habit of removing the [credentials] section of the .gitconfig file. To get around this, copy the credential section to the gitconfig file in the msysgit directory (If you followed the installation defaults it will probably be in C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\etc.) You’ll have to run as administrator in order to edit that gitconfig file due to its location.

If you have multiple users on your machine you may also want to move the installed location of git-credentials-winstore as it installs in your AppData directory. However, I’ve not tried this as I’m the only user on my machine.

You can now use GitBash and Tortoise Git with your GitHub repository.

Software Development, Tip of the Day

Tip of the day: Getting Visual Studio with TFS to work offline

Earlier to day our TFS server went down. Visual Studio likes to have a constant connection open to it, but obviously that wasn’t going to happen. Luckily, it is possible to work on a solution with no connection to TFS.

If you were just starting some work…

If Visual Studio was open when TFS went off-line then it won’t allow you to check out any files. If all your files are checked in already, then you can just shut down Visual Studio and then start again. When the solution opens it detects that TFS is gone and offers to open the project in Offline mode:

Go Offline
TFS Go Offline

When TFS is available again you can simply reconnect to the server by selecting the Team?Connect to Team Foundation Server… menu. Once you are connected, you can right-click the solution and select “Go Online“.

You’ll get a dialog that asks to to confirm the files that you’ve changed in the meantime:

Go Online
TFS Go Online

It will then take a few moments for TFS to catch up (I have quite a large solution, so it took about a minute for me) then the files appeared in the Pending Changes window ready to be checked in as normal.

If you were in the middle of something

If you already had files checked out when TFS went offline then this post about converting to offline may be more useful to you.

There is also a Visual Studio extension, if you prefer not having to restart Visual Studio called Go Offline. Once installed, just to to File?Source Control?Go Offline. This may be a more useful solution if you are constantly going in and out of connection with TFS (a mobile broadband connection on a train for example).